Lolly-Madonna XXX: Review on Southern Atmosphere

Being a Tennessee native, it is fascinating to watch films that were filmed in your home state: The Volunteer State and the state with good old-fashioned country music. One of the movies I selected to watch that was filmed in East Tennessee in ’72 was “Lolly-Madonna XXX.” The reason for choosing this movie? After reading Wikipedia, which had some information regarding the story, it was about a rift between two Tennessee neighbors over land and a female whose name was supposed to be “Lolly-Madonna.” However, since the summary of the story is shared on the internet, this post will focus on the southern atmosphere behind the film. In other words, how southern the movie is/is not and define any stereotypes that stand out, but are not always accurate.

Despite the director’s focus on two southern families despising each other, it doesn’t really have a southern atmosphere to it, other than living in a mountainous region. For instance, you see the Gutshalls and Feathers living in the mountains. Some of the actors portray a southern accent, but not all of them. The majority of the accents are out-of-place, except for the actor who played Thrush. And the families are nowhere near close to being hillbillies. Other stereotypes within the film include: hillbillies consuming lots of alcohol, ride horses and chase women as a hobby and lastly, are the most unsophisticated folks residing in the boondocks. These are the stereotypes Hollywood continues to stick with when every southern film they make is created and sold into theaters for profit. They don’t seem to do their research and meet country folks before creating a story about them. Rather, they spend more time focusing on the character’s ignorance rather than balance out the intelligent and unintelligent hillbillies.

An upcoming post of this will dive into the unique and not-so unique aspects of this film. And it will cover the moral of the story. Other than these typical stereotypes of hillbillies, the movie was fantastic overall.

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